Programme

Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds.

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Friday, October 25, 2019Saturday, October 26, 2019Sunday, October 27, 2019

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

09:30-10:00 Conference Registration | 601 (6F)

10:00-10:30 Announcements & Welcome Address | 601 (6F)

10:30-11:30 Keynote Presentation | Room 601 (6F)

11:30-12:15 Panel Presentation | Room 601 (6F)

12:15-12:30 IAFOR Documentary Photography Award | Room 601 (6F)

12:30-12:45 Conference Photograph | Room 601 (6F)

12:45-14:00 Lunch Break | Room 601 (6F)

14:00-14:45 Keynote Presentation | Room 601 (6F)

14:45-15:30 Panel Presentation | Room 601 (6F)

15:30-15:45 Coffee Break

15:45-16:45 Conference Poster Session | Room 601 (6F)

17:30-19:00: Conference Welcome Reception | Garb Central

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

09:00-10:40 Parallel Session I

10:40-10:55 Coffee Break

10:55-12:10 Parallel Session II

12:10-13:10 Lunch Break

13:10-14:25 Parallel Session III

14:25-14:40 Coffee Break

14:40-15:55 Parallel Session IV

16:00-17:00 Featured Presentation

18:00-20:00: Official Conference Dinner | Za Watami (optional extra)

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

09:00-10:40 Parallel Session I

10:40-11:00 Coffee Break

11:00-12:40 Parallel Session II

12:40-13:45 Lunch Break

13:45-15:00 Parallel Session III

15:00-15:15 Coffee Break

15:15-16:30 Parallel Session IV

16:30-16:45 Conference Closing Session


Featured Presentations

  • Gender Equality in the Japanese Film Industry
    Gender Equality in the Japanese Film Industry
    Keynote Presentation: Erina Ito
  • Australia and Asia: Media and Identity in a Time of Change
    Australia and Asia: Media and Identity in a Time of Change
    Keynote Presentation: Nasya Bahfen
  • Observation vs. Immersion: Trends in Contemporary Visual Anthropology
    Observation vs. Immersion: Trends in Contemporary Visual Anthropology
    Panel Presentation: Timothy W. Pollock, Roger Horn
  • Deepfake
    Deepfake
    Roundtable/Panel Presentation: Gary E. Swanson

Final Programme

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule. All registered delegates who attend The Asian Conference on Media, Communication & Film receive a printed copy of the Conference Programme at the Registration Desk on arrival. Only one copy of the Conference Programme is available per delegate, so please take good care of your copy.

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available on September 23, 2019. The final Conference Programme will be available on October 11, 2019.

Accepted abstracts of confirmed presenters are available here.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past MediAsia conferences via the links below.

Gender Equality in the Japanese Film Industry
Keynote Presentation: Erina Ito

The #MeToo movement had a global impact, helping highlight issues of gender inequality in various spheres of public and private life, and this impact also extended to Japan. There are many parallels between the Japanese film industry and Japanese politics when it comes to gender inequality. In Japan, only 10.1% of the House of Representatives is female despite the fact that the population is over 51% female, and there is currently only one female cabinet member.

Over the last twenty years in the Japanese film industry, only 3% of the films produced by the top four major Japanese film companies (Toho, Toei, Shochiku, and Kadokawa) were made by female directors, despite the fact that research conducted for this study revealed that the percentage of female students studying film at major universities and vocational schools has remained steady at about 40% over the same time period.

While the candidate gender equality law was passed in Japan last May in an effort to get political parties to equalise the number of male and female candidates in national and regional parliamentary elections, no such concerted efforts have been made to improve the situation in the film industry. This article reveals the multi-tiered approach to resolving the gender equity problem in the US film industry (from the selection of film festival committee members and film company executives, to wage equality and employment opportunities for actors and staff) and hypotheses how some of these ideas may be applied in Japan, in the entertainment industry and in politics.

Read presenter biographies.

Australia and Asia: Media and Identity in a Time of Change
Keynote Presentation: Nasya Bahfen

The increasing pace, intensity and scale of migration, urbanisation and globalisation is one of the biggest challenges faced by the societies of two neighbouring continents (Australia and Asia). Across both continents, economies will be substantially reconfigured, with jobs in a range of industries lost to automation and an increase in the movement of people as the effects of climate change are felt. Against the backdrop of these changes, the media – despite widespread technological disruptions to its operations – continues to be a crucial disseminator of narratives of national identity. In this paper, I look at Australia’s changing media discourse about identity. Historically a monocultural British outpost, Australia is now a cultural melting pot predicted to have a population of 37.6 million people by 2050, with Melbourne and Sydney each accommodating 8 million. The country has undergone key shifts in its foreign policy outlook with the first following World War Two when Canberra’s allegiance to Britain turned into a strategic alliance with the United States. As a new superpower emerges in China, Australia has been forced – kicking and screaming – to confront the geopolitical reality of its location and its changing populace, and pivot towards Asia. How will the Australian media reflect the country’s role within and connection to Asia, as they continue to develop and change over time?

Read presenter biographies.

Observation vs. Immersion: Trends in Contemporary Visual Anthropology
Panel Presentation: Timothy W. Pollock, Roger Horn

A seismic shift has occurred in the area of visual anthropology. The naïve realism encoded in long takes shot proscenium-style has given way to a more impressionistic approach that aims at creating a more immersive experience for the viewer. A seminal moment in this movement is often credited to the 2012 release of the film Leviathan by Lucien Castaing‐Taylor and Véréna Paravel, but the groundwork for this shift was being laid well before.

This new approach, championed by, among others, Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab, can be seen as following in the theoretical footsteps of neo formalism, and therefore faces some of the same theoretical challenges. Do the techniques utilised by this new wave of visual anthropologists actually affect the audience in the ways the filmmakers claim? Could these reactions be culturally bound? And what does this approach mean for anthropology as a discipline, and how it defines itself?

New and exciting developments and paradigm shifts in a discipline often lead to a reevaluation of the discipline itself, and this panel will draw together experts in the field to discuss this exciting new direction in visual anthropology and what it means for the future of the discipline.

Deepfake
Roundtable/Panel Presentation: Gary E. Swanson

For more than a century, audio and video have functioned as a bedrock of truth in our society. Not only have sound and images recorded our history, they have also informed and shaped our perception of reality. But some people question the facts around events that unquestionably happened, like the Holocaust, the moon landing and 9/11, despite video proof.

Enter “Deepfake.” The term refers to artificial intelligence techniques used to combine and superimpose multiple images or videos onto source material. The process can be used to make it look as if people did or said things they did not.

Experts recently told CNN that “Deepfake” technology is not yet sophisticated enough to fake large-scale historical events or conflicts, but they worry that the doubt sown by a single convincing “Deepfake” could alter our trust in news and information forever. If “Deepfakes” make people believe they can’t trust video, the problems of misinformation and conspiracy theories could get worse. And while “fake news” is often a politically loaded term for junk news, “Deepfake” strikes at everyone equally, regardless of their place on the political spectrum.

One thing is for sure: The use (or misuse) of this technology will change news and information as we know it. It can challenge the way we receive and process new information and will become one of the hottest, most controversial terms around in 2020 and beyond.

Read presenter biographies.