Programme

Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Tuesday, November 9, 2021Wednesday, November 10, 2021Thursday, November 11, 2021Friday, November 12, 2021

09:00–12:00: Plenary Session

12:00–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Plenary Session

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Plenary Session

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Closing Session


Featured Presentations

  • ‘Holy War’ as Portrayed in Japanese Films, 1937-45
    ‘Holy War’ as Portrayed in Japanese Films, 1937-45
    Keynote Presentation: Brian Victoria

Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on October 11, 2021. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past MediAsia conferences via the links below.

‘Holy War’ as Portrayed in Japanese Films, 1937-45
Keynote Presentation: Brian Victoria

The invention of motion pictures at the end of the 19th century, followed by the advent of “talkies” in 1927, provided an effective means, together with newspapers and radio, for governments to keep their citizens informed. However, if it is true that one person’s “freedom fighter” is another’s “terrorist”, then it is also true that government “information” and government “propaganda” are closely related, so much so that, at times, they are nearly indistinguishable. At no time are the differences between the two less distinguishable than when nations go to war, for the governments of the warring parties require both the wealth and the very lives of their citizenry.

In 2001 Anne Morelli wrote a book entitled The basic Principles of War Propaganda in which she described ten principles of war propaganda that manifest themselves in the media of countries party to the conflict. Using these principles as an analytic tool, this presentation will examine a series of WWII films produced by the Imperial Japanese military, both dramas and documentaries, to reveal the nature of wartime Japanese propaganda. The presentation’s ultimate goal is to enhance participants’ ability to identify and withstand government propaganda, especially during wartime.

Read presenters' biography